My current list…some listened to more than others. I don’t stress about not keeping up…

Italics is the relevant ad for the podcast which gives you an idea about what they are about.

Interesting stuff

  • 99% Invisible Architecture Infrastructure Cities Objects Sounds Visuals Technology History Roman Mars – all sorts of interesting
  • Reply all “’A podcast about the internet’ that is actually an unfailingly original exploration of modern life and how to survive it.” – The Guardian. I don’t always listen to this, but I like their laughter
  • L&R Love and radio Nick van der Kolk’s Love and Radio features in-depth, otherworldly-produced interviews with an eclectic range of subjects, from the seedy to the sublime. interesting, quirky stuff that I dip in and out of…can be quite submersive
  • RadioLab I heard Jad Abumrad as a keynote in Portland at ACRL in 2015. I don’t always get to catch up on this one, but it’s recommended.
  • This American Life one of the first I listened to, stories on a theme. I admit I only sometimes do now…have I outgrown it?
  • The Moth the art and craft of storytelling. Great premise and great stories by regular and not so regular people
  • Here’s the thing Alec Baldwin brings listeners into the lives of artists, policy makers and performers.
  • The West Wing Weekly episode-by-episode discussion of one of television’s most beloved shows, I always listen to this as a WW tragic. Now up the the final season!!
  • Unorthodox the world’s leading Jewispodcast. I’ve been listening to this one for a few years now and really enjoy. I have no affinity especially with Jewish people, but like this blend of guests and narrative, and the three people who present it
  • ABC Conversations another one I dip in and out of depending on the guest, but fascinating conversations.
  • Disgraceland Disgraceland is a new true crime podcast about musicians getting away with murder … If you love true crime and you love music get ready to love Disgraceland. Recommended!
  • David Tennant does a podcast with David Tennant gets talking with the biggest names from TV, movies, comedy and elsewhere. Revealing conversation, surprise stories and lots of laughs. Great interviews and you get to listen to David!
  • The screen show film and TV reviews, ABC
  • The Adam Buxton podcast another recent recommendation, UK comedian, I listened to an interview with Charlotte Church which was interesting/fun…will it be a regular listen? not sure
  • The Paris Review An audio odyssey through the life and times of The Paris Review, featuring a phantasmagoric blend of classic stories and poems; interviews with the likes of James Baldwin, Jack Kerouac, and Dorothy Parker; and new work and original readings by the cutting-edge writers of our time. another recent recommendation, my friend said….it just makes you feel smarter…. for a car trip…
  • This podcast will kill you Grad students studying disease ecology, Erin and Erin found themselves disenchanted with the insular world of academia. They wanted a way to share their love of epidemics and weird medical mysteries with the world, not just colleagues. Plus, who doesn’t love an excuse to have a cocktail while chatting about pus and poop? Have only listened to a few, a recent recommendation. And a cocktail per disease!
  • Classic flow ABC Yoga and meditation set to classical music, rolled into one bliss-making podcast. I listen to this in bed….no yoga involved!! Ha.

Politics I have this current fascination with Trump. I cannot believe the train wreck this is US politics, but more scary is how it is spreading…I listen to Pod save America first over the following three

  • Pod save America A political podcast for people not yet ready to give up or go insane. A no-bullshit conversation about politics hosted by Jon Favreau, Jon Lovett, Dan Pfeiffer and Tommy Vietor that breaks down the week’s news and helps people figure out what matters and how to help. I listen to this one weekly
  • Pod save the world A no-bullshit conversation about foreign policy.I used to think foreign policy was boring, complicated and irrelevant to my life. Then I served for four years as President Obama’s National Security Spokesman. The hours I spent in Situation Room meetings, traveling abroad, and talking with the brilliant men and women who advised President Obama was the most fascinating education I ever had. It was a crash course in foreign policy that taught me two things: anyone can understand these issues, and we all have an obligation to try.On Pod Save the World, I’ll go behind the scenes with the people responsible for some of the most important foreign policy decisions of our time. We’ll geek out about the most important issues of the day, but talk like normal human beings. That means you’ll also hear cool stories, funny anecdotes and maybe a few F bombs. 
  • Pod save the people Organizer and activist DeRay Mckesson explores news, culture, social justice, and politics through deep conversations with influencers and experts… Each week brings a news analysis, followed by deep conversations about social, political and cultural issues with experts, influencers, and diverse local and national leaders.
  • Trumpcast A quasi-daily podcast from Slate chronicling Donald Trump’s rise to the presidency and his current administration. A new one for me, yet to listen to, but Unorthodox presenter had a session there and sounded interesting. More Trump. More eye rolling!

Crime – why so much crime? I honestly don’t know. Real stories? I think it all started with Serial, then The Teacher’s Pet and grew from there….

  • They walk among us UK true crime podcast, aiming to cover a broad range of cases from the sinister to the surreal. I frequently listen to this one.
  • Criminal Stories of people who’ve done wrong, been wronged, or gotten caught somewhere in the middle. Again, I often listen to l=this one. Good storytelling. US
  • Cold case files Murders go unsolved. Killers slip through the cracks. With the passage of time, families lose hope and another unsolved homicide file settles into obscurity. The pattern is familiar, but changing, thanks to the efforts of a special breed of detectives. Cold Case Files tells the story of their work. Longer, I listen to this one infrequently
  • Real crime profile Join Jim Clemente (former FBI profiler), Laura Richards (criminal behavioral analyst, former New Scotland Yard) and Lisa Zambetti (Casting director for CBS’ Criminal Minds) as they profile behavior from real criminal cases Listened to their series on the disappearance of Madeleine McCann. May unsubscribe, not satisfying…
  • Canadian true crime An independent podcast telling stories of some of the most heinous, controversial, heartbreaking and thought-provoking true crime cases in Canada. Canadian True Crime is produced and narrated by Kristi Lee, an Australian who lives in Canada. I like hearing the Australian accent!
  • UK True Crime every Tuesday  Another one I listen to most weeks, at the start Adam gives news and music etc for the time of the crime, eg 1997 – what was happening in the world
  • Going west haven’t listened to this, or this Over my dead body

Library

  • The librarian is in New York Public Library’s podcast about books, culture, and what to read next.
  • Library talks Feed your brain every Sunday with the best live conversations from The New York Public Library. An eclectic mix of voices and perspectives
  • Turbitt & Duck

 

v few library podcasts…

Waiting for Julia Gillard’s new podcast – A Podcast of One’s Own – to get to Google Podcasts- my podcast app

What are you listening to?

What do you recommend?

What podcast app do you use and why??

Where and when do you listen to podcasts? I listen mainly in bed, when on longer car trips and sometimes on the bus.


Argh agnotology

26Jun19

Yesterday I went to an ACT Associations Forum lunch, and Anna-Maria Arabia, CEO at the Australian Academy of Science gave a lunch talk on The Challenges Associations Face in a Post-fact, Post-trust World.

The Australian Academy of Science has 530 fellows/members elected by peers.

My notes:

New word for me: Agnotology  is the study of culturally induced ignorance or doubt, particularly the publication of inaccurate or misleading scientific data

Anna-Maria provided lots of facts and figures – evidence. Quoted the Rand Corporation ‘Truth Decay‘ report of 2018. There are four trends that characterise Truth Decay:

  1. increasing disagreement about facts and analytical interpretations of facts and data
  2. a blurring of the line between opinion and fact
  3. the increasing relative volume and resulting influence of opinion and personal experience over fact
  4. declining trust in formerly respected sources of facts.

This erodes trust, seeding doubt, facts are cherry picked.

Uncertainty – scientists are familiar with uncertainty, but others not.

with easy access to information – no interpretation, validation, value added, synthesis. It’s hard for debate if information and arguments are not unpacked. We need facts to make decisions.

Interestingly in climate debates of 2011- giving more and more facts didn’t work. Trust is built on relationships and stories. Need to connect with emotions. Need to appeal to value systems. You can’t just give facts to change people’s minds. Tell stories.

what can we do?

  • synthesise data
  • uphold integrity with what we do
  • have conversations, stories to tell the facts
  • ensure integrity, robust systems  of debate

Anna- Maria pointed out that we don’t routinely say ‘what does the science say?’, or if we do the science is not transparent and evidence based but cherry picked and out of context. Politicians more likely to hear ‘what do the economics say?” or ‘what about my marginal seat?’

The Academy of Science – social media processes- five fellows approve each post to maintain integrity of posts. Now using quick videos to highlight reports (which link to shorter and longer content.


Oh #APLIC18

05Aug18

I’m tired, my head is spinning. You’ve done it to me APLIC18

Quick notes courtesy of some great tweets. And by the way, how great is twitter for conferences and talks?  We even had a #APLICleftbehind hashtag. Was it only ten or so years ago that tweeting at a library conference was like being the naughty child, with disapproving librarians tsking tsking around me? Now it’s just so powerful. And thankyou to Uti for curating the tweets on wakelet

Random thoughts in no particular order…

Loved just catching up and connecting with people – so much of what I do is online or remote and it was just nice putting faces to names. Seeing the familiar and meeting up with new people – these F2F interactions cannot be underestimated.

Keynotes (which were all recorded and will be available within the month)

Lucy Bloom – putting on a daring, roaring, out there woman to start APLIC18 was a great idea – got me snorting at her birth story and Brazilians and made anything possible.

Opeta Alefaio – I met Opeta in Fiji last October as part of the accreditation visit. We didn’t have a lot of free time, but made time to visit the National Archives of Fiji at Opeta’s urging/invitation. What fantastic stories and the impact of the archives is so powerful. When archives go out to communities – people connect, find out about their heritage, their past. Impact of outreach to build influence and credibility.

Dave Snowden – the name rang a big bell, but it was only after I realised that David Snowden was big in knowledge management when I studied KM at uni in the early 2000s. I found you smart but annoying, dropping lots of ideas and theories into such a short amount of time – but I will watch your keynote again for the bits I need. His conference dinner reflection: the dance of the librarians. Slides from keynote and a TEDx (5 mins) to watch for later.

Christine Mackenzie / INELI-Oceania. This was a late entry into the conference as a keynote pulled out a week prior, but really glad that this was included. It fit so well with the ALIA focus on SDGs, with publications such as Australian libraries support sustainable development goals. Libraries have the potential to have real impact on people’s lives, and expect more on this. This cannot be underestimated. And we do have a place in the Pacific.

Michael Stephens. What an absolute joy and pleasure to see Michael in action with such an impassioned keynote to end the 3 days. I met Michael online many years ago he was probably one of the first library people I connected with online. I took part in the Hyperlinked Library MOOC and when I found out that Michael would be speaking at APLIC I messaged him, asking him if he would come to Canberra…and he did! Carl and I spent a lovely day with Michael and his partner Steve, and we just connected. The best. What a gentle, thoughtful, inspirational person. A friend.

It was so lovely to meet up with Michael at APLIC18. Michael invited Carl and I to Michigan and we will come one day I know. But the joy was seeing Michael’s keynote, the slides don’t tell the whole story. I loved Michael’s movement, his sudden realisation that he had a monitor to see his slides!…his humanity. This is my kind of stuff. Refective practice. Responsibilty. Open mindedness. Whole heartedness. Always learning.

The heart of librarianship. We listen. We teach. We build community. We welcome everyone.

We have the tech. We do the tech. But with heart.

Lead from the heart. Learn from the heart and play from the heart.

I also really thought the four spaces of the public library model that Michael referenced was so applicable and usable…the library for inspiration space, learning space, meeting space, performative space.

 

And books. I loved the book stuff. As a profession we often hear people say things like “oh you’re a librarian – it must be so nice sitting around and reading books/ being around books blah blah blah…” I didnt’ hear the author panel but followed on twitter, but I loved the author signings and the free books. How great to be at an event where there are books – great to have the publishers involved! I only left with two btw.

Part two to follow…where I talk *vibe*


Not sure what to call this post.

‘The other night I heard and saw one of the fathers of the internet?’ We shall see

[Can’t actually believe that it’s been a year since I last blogged? Lots of conversations around these days about perhaps going back to blogging, longer reads, away from Twitter…again…we shall see. I do enjoy longer form writing and I do quite deliberately not engage in some of the Twitter convos these days. I do like Twitter for links and staying in touch with colleagues around the world…it makes library land closer and i love the sharing].

Anyway back to Vint Cerf. I have been going to quite a few ANU talks after work these days- usually one a week on the way home from work, often an author/book launch. But last week it was the annual J G Crawford Oration at the ANU – Vinton G Cerf, vice president and Chief Internet Evangelist for Google .

Vint arrived in Australia that day, flew to Canberra, had a formal ANU lunch, went over to Tidbinbilla Deep Space Tracking Station and then presented the JG Crawford Oration – all in a day. He has since been to UNSW and is probably now back in the US.

Vint is known as one of the fathers of the internet having co-developed internet protocols TCP and IP with Bob Kahn.

His talk was partly historical with some great photos of early computing and internet, and then his current work developing interplanetary protocols for deep space- the interplanetary internet. [My personal feelings on the development of the interplanetary internet is can’t we get it right or better on earth, can’t we spend this money on more pressing concerns like climate change?]

His two slides on the unfinished internet…

and

these are my notes on some of his points from these slides…

the need for transparency

not to oversell or become overly dependent on AI,

computers were meant to give us time to do other things…

wants public to be sceptical

Vint stated that his frustration was that technology was used to harm, and his response to this was

  • find tech means to stop bad behaviour on the internet
  • develop global laws to enforce
  • and to call out bad behaviour – “don’t do that – it’s wrong” and he commented that this is increasing, norms arising now to call out bad behaviour.

The last part of the evening was 15 minutes in conversation with Professor Genevieve Bell, who is head of ANU’s 3A Institute – that’s Autonomy, Agency and Assurance. I have heard G Bell a few times over the years- the first time many years ago at NLA when Genevieve was with Intel working as an anthropologist. I think that increasingly the work that the 3A Institute was developed to do is so important … ” to build a new applied science around the management of artificial intelligence, data and technology and of their impact on humanity”, from https://cecs.anu.edu.au/3a-institute

Genevieve commented that over the formal lunch on that day she had detected a thread of anxiety about the future and asked Vint for two ways people could build a positive future.

His reply

  1. Be serious about digital literacy. Do not underestimate the fragility of digital content. The medium is not guaranteed. He asked us to think about our phones and all the pictures we take. He said that when he is asked about the best way to keep photos he says, print them out on good quality paper and they should last 100, 150 years.
  2. Critical thinking – activate and encourage critical thinking. Information overload was pre-internet. Had anyone ever read all the books published? Seek out trustable sources. Consume. Reject. Think. Seek.

Two pretty obvious spaces/opportunities for libraries – where libraries are and should be.

Oh, and of his work as Chief Internet Evangelist for Google, Vint works and travels for the 3.8 billion people that are not online. He evangelises (?) the internet as a means of increasing health and income outcomes. Making the internet useful!


Kathryn asks the question – what’s your blog all about?

Well?

Probably

  • life, including bereavements
  • family
  • parenting
  • music
  • movies
  • reading
  • some library?

In fact if you want to know, my most popular post ever is ….

da da

Holy farting Birkenstocks – true. I think because it is a problem (suction, air, farting noises at times)

I guess it has always been more of a blog of bits of me with no special emphasis.

Why don’t I blog about my profession? Not sure, do I need topics to guide?

Truth right now is that I busy just learning my job these days, and I am doing the best jigsaw right now (pic to come sometime), and a few projects being hatched that are taking my energy and time right now.

What I know i missed through not taking part in #blogjune is the community.


Someone, not someone, a dear friend…sent me an email today.

A photo of a rainbow and the wish that i had rainbows in my line of sight…

Perfect.

Dont want to feel anxious about a bunch of projects at work, so concentrating on other things right now…

Started reading ‘all the light we cannot see’

And just back from the movies with a poet friend ‘a silent passion’

And that rainbow.

Life is good.

postscript

#glamblogweekly like the idea of a weekly blog


I love that I learn. I learn what I love. I love that I live. I sometimes (still) surprise myself.

What did I learn in 2016?

grab opportunities – a new work opportunity came up, and I embraced it, grabbed it and I love it! I left almost 13 years in an academic library to work at ALIA in this job. Now I’m working across all types of libraries, and the LIS and GLAM sector.

don’t let things slide – like the old frog happily sitting in a pot of water that is slowly coming to the boil…I don’t want to let things slide like they did…I was unhappy. I acknowledge that. But I couldn’t move on. Or wasn’t looking in the right directions. I was fighting bureaucracy and the system. I was letting my unhappiness consume me. Some things you can change. And some things you cannot – so acknowledge and work with it or acknowledge and move on.

what goes around sometimes comes around again – in a past life/job I was an employment counselor, and a (small) part of my job now is talking to people about working/studying/possibilities in the LIS sector.

moving on doesn’t mean losing touch – hangouts, Skype, email, Instagram – they are all great ways for me to stay in touch with colleagues. And I am co-presenting a paper at ALIA Online next month with a special colleague and friend.

i waste time – not so new this revelation, but trying for more purposeful reading and reflecting for 2017

life never stands still  – now is my/our time to travel – the kids have left home (mostly)

*don’t fight myself – seriously, my worst enemy is me. always.

 

#glamblogclub

*this one has really nothing to do with 2016. ongoing!

 




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